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L-NP Lead in Four Major States

The telephone Morgan Poll on State voting intention was conducted in July 10/11 and August 7/8 & 14/15, 2012 with a cross-section of Australian electors in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia. In New South Wales 171 electors were interviewed in July 2012 & 321 in August 2012. In Victoria 136 electors were interviewed in July 2012 & 343 in August 2012. In Queensland 319 electors were interviewed in July & August 2012. In Western Australia 319 electors were interviewed in July & August 2012.

A special telephone Morgan Poll on State voting intention conducted in July and August shows the L-NP ahead in Australia’s four largest States: NSW: L-NP (59.5%) cf. ALP (40.5%); Victoria: L-NP (53%) cf. ALP (47%); Queensland: LNP (59%) cf. ALP (41%) and Western Australia L-NP (60%) cf. ALP (40%) on a two-party preferred basis according to the telephone Morgan Poll conducted on the nights of  August 7/8 & 13-15, 2012 and also on July 10/11, 2012 in Western Australia.

NEW SOUTH WALES: L-NP would win a State Election Easily

2PP: L-NP (59.5%, down 5.5% since a Morgan Poll in July 2012) cf. ALP (40.5%, up 5.5%).

Primary vote: L-NP (53%, down 3.5%); ALP (27%, up 5.5%), Greens (10%, down 0.5%), Independents/ Others (10%, down 1.5%).

Preferred Premier (Barry O’Farrell v John Robertson): Mr. O’Farrell (50.5%, down 8% since July , 2012); Mr. Robertson (21%, up 7.5%); Other/ Neither (28.5%, up 0.5%). Lead to Mr. O’Farrell: 29.5%.

Approval of Job Performance — Premier (Barry O’Farrell): Approve (35.5%, down 9.5%); Disapprove (40%, up 6%); Can’t say (24.5%, up 3.5%). Approve — Disapprove: -4.5%.

Approval of Job — Opposition Leader (John Robertson): Approve (22.5%, up 0.5%); Disapprove (36.5%, down 11%); Can’t say (41%, up 10.5%). Approve — Disapprove: -14%.

 

VICTORIA: L-NP would win a close State Election

2PP: L-NP (53%, down 1% since a Morgan Poll in July 2012) cf. ALP (47%, up 1%).

Primary vote: L-NP (47%, up 7.5%); ALP (34%, down 4%), Greens (11%, down 2.5%), Independents/ Others (8%, down 1%).

Preferred Premier (Ted Baillieu v Daniel Andrews): Mr. Baillieu (43%, up 7.5% since July, 2012); Mr. Andrews (28.5%, down 3.5%); Other/ Neither (28.5%, down 4%). Lead to Mr. Baillieu: 14.5%.

Approval of Job Performance — Premier (Ted Baillieu): Approve (29.5%, up 9%); Disapprove (47%, down 16.5%); Can’t say (23.5%, up 7.5%). Approve — Disapprove: -17.5%.

Approval of Job — Opposition Leader (Daniel Andrews): Approve (28.5%, up 2.5%); Disapprove (30.5%, down 6%); Can’t say (41%, up 3.5%). Approve — Disapprove: -2%.

 

QUEENSLAND: LNP would win a State Election Easily

2PP: LNP (59%, down 3% since a Morgan Poll in June, 2012) cf. ALP (41%, up 3%).

Primary vote: LNP (51%, down 3.5%), ALP (27.5%, down 0.5%), Greens (7.5%, unchanged), Katter’s Australian Party (5%, up 1.5%), Independents/ Others (9%, up 2.5%).

Preferred Premier (Campbell Newman v Annastacia Palaszczuk): Mr. Newman (62.5%, down 5%); Ms. Palaszczuk (20.5%, up 4.5%); Other/ Neither (17%, up 0.5%). Lead to Mr. Newman: 42%.

Approval of Job Performance — Premier (Campbell Newman): Approve (51%, down 2%); Disapprove (36%, up 9.5%); Can’t say (13, down 7.5%). Approve — Disapprove: +15%.

Approval of Job — Opposition Leader (Annastacia Palaszczuk): Approve (33%, up 6.5%); Disapprove (28.5%, up 7.5%); Can’t say (38.5%, down 14%). Approve — Disapprove: +4.5%.

 

WESTERN AUSTRALIA: L-NP would win a State Election Easily

2PP: L-NP 60%, down 2.5% since a Morgan Poll in May 2012) cf. ALP (40.0%, up 2.5%).

Primary vote: L-NP (47.5%, down 6%), WA Nationals (3.5%, unchanged), ALP (31%, up 1.5%), Greens (7%, up 1%), Independents/ Others (11%, up 3.5%).

Preferred Premier (Colin Barnett v Mark McGowan): Mr. Barnett (52.5%, down 1.5%); Mr. McGowan (27%, up 0.5%); Other/ Neither (20.5%, up 1%). Lead to Mr. Barnett: 25.5%.

Approval of Job Performance — Premier (Colin Barnett): Approve (50%, down 4%); Disapprove (31.5%, down 2%); Can’t say (18.5%, up 6%). Approve — Disapprove: +18.5%.

Approval of Job — Opposition Leader (Mark McGowan): Approve (46.5%, up 10%); Disapprove (19%, up 0.5%); Can’t say (34.5%, down 10.5%). Approve — Disapprove: +27.5%.

 

Gary Morgan says:

“If State Elections were today held in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia the L-NP would be returned.

“Today's Morgan Poll conducted mid-August shows Victorian Premier Ted Baillieu’s L-NP Coalition now has a clear lead with support at 53% (up 1% since June 2012) on a two-party preferred basis with ALP support at 47% (down 1%).

“A Morgan Poll conducted July 10/11, 2012 with a small sample showed a sharp drop in support for the Baillieu Government and Ted Baillieu's approval rating. This fall can be attributed to several reasons.

"Firstly, the July Morgan Poll was held the week before the State Melbourne by-election which the Victorian Liberal Party didn't contest. All Melbourne's political media focused heavily on the Labor Green contest with no mention of the Liberal Party.

“Secondly, at the same time Premier Baillieu was overseas on a holiday while the Victorian media focused on recent industrial disputes with nurses and teachers, and Premier Baillieu's failure to honor promises made to them about pay and conditions in the lead-up to the 2010 Victorian State Election.

“Since returning to Victoria, Baillieu has been much more aggressively communicating to ‘get his message out’ and blaming the past Labor Government for excessive spending and waste, and Julia Gillard's Carbon Tax for price rises and the industrial slow down. This ‘bolder and more aggressive’ approach by the Premier explains the improvement in the Liberal vote between June and August — the Liberal primary vote increased to 47% (up 2.5% since June) while the ALP vote barely changed over this period (34%, up 0.5%).”

 

Electors were asked: “If a State Election for the New South Wales/ Victoria/ Queensland were being held today — which party would receive your first preference?”

The telephone Morgan Poll on State voting intention was conducted in July 10/11 and August 7/8 & 14/15, 2012 with a cross-section of Australian electors in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia.

In New South Wales 171 electors were interviewed in July 2012 & 321 in August 2012. In Victoria 136 electors were interviewed in July 2012 & 343 in August 2012. In Queensland 319 electors were interviewed in July & August 2012. In Western Australia 319 electors were interviewed in July & August 2012.

 

VICTORIA

If a Victorian State Election were held today Ted Baillieu’s Victorian L-NP Government would be re-elected. The L-NP 53% (up 1% since June 2012 and up 7% since a small-sampled Morgan Poll on July 10/11, 2012) leads the ALP 47% (down 1% since June 2012, and down 7% since July 10/11, 2012) on a two-party preferred basis according to a special telephone Morgan Poll conducted in Victoria during August 7-14, 2012.

Primary support for the L-NP is 47% (up 2.5% since June 2012) ahead of the ALP (34%, up 0.5%), the Greens 11% (down 4.5%) and Independents/ Others 8% (up 1.5%).

If a Victorian State Election were held now the L-NP would win a close election.

Better Victorian Premier (Ted Baillieu v Daniel Andrews)

When electors were asked who would make the better Premier — Premier Ted Baillieu at 43% (up 2%) is clearly preferred to Opposition Leader Daniel Andrews (28.5%, down 5%) an improvement for Baillieu since June, and a large improvement for Baillieu since the small-sample Morgan Poll conducted July 10/11, 2012 which showed Baillieu 35.5% cf. Andrews 32%.

Job Approval (Ted Baillieu v Daniel Andrews)

Far fewer electors approve of Premier Baillieu’s job performance as Premier (29.5%, up 0.5%) compared to 47% (down 6.5%) that disapprove while 23.5% (up 6%) can’t say.

Slightly more electors disapprove of Opposition Leader Daniel Andrews’ job performance with 30.5% (down 4.5%) disapproving and 28.5% (up 0.5%) approving while a very large 41% (up 4%) still can’t say.

Think will win & would like to win the Victorian State Election

A clear majority, 60.5% (up 4%) of Victorians now think the L-NP would win a State Election — if held now — compared to only 26.5% (down 7%) that think the ALP would win while 13% (up 3%) can’t say.

Electors also favour the L-NP in terms of who they ‘would like to win’ a State Election if held now with 45% (down 2%) saying they would like the L-NP to win a new election compared to 39% (down 2%) that would like the ALP to win while 16% (up 4%) can’t say.

These are the main findings of a special Australia-wide telephone Morgan Poll including 136 electors interviewed in Victoria in July 2012 (of all electors surveyed 7% did not name a party) & 343 in August 2012 (of all electors surveyed 6.5% did not name a party).

 

Primary Voting Intention

 

Victorian State

Elections

Telephone Morgan Poll

 

Nov 25,

2006

Nov 27,

2010

Nov 30 &

Dec 1, 2010

April 5-10,

2011

Mar 20-28,

2012

June 5-13,

2012

July 10-11,

2012**

August 7-14,

2012

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

L-NP

39.6 (5.2)

44.8 (6.8)

46 (3.5)

48 (2)

45.5 (2)

44.5 (4.5)

39.5 (1.5)

47 (2.5)

ALP

43.1

36.2

32

31

35.5

33.5

38

34

Greens

10.0

11.2

14

11.5

12.5

15.5

13.5

11

Independents/

Others

7.3

7.8

8

9.5

6.5

6.5

9

8

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

**Small sample for this interviewing period of only 136 electors means these numbers must be treated with a degree of caution.

 

Two-Party Preferred

 

Victorian State

Elections

Telephone Morgan Poll

 

Nov 25,

2006

Nov 27,

2010

Nov 30 &

Dec 1, 2010

April 5-10,

2011

Mar 20-28,

2012

June 5-13,

2012

July 10-11,

2012**

August 7-14,

2012

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

L-NP

45.6

51.6

57

57

53

52

46

53

ALP

54.4

48.4

43

43

47

48

54

47

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

**Small sample for this interviewing period of only 136 electors means these numbers must be treated with a degree of caution.

 

Think will win the Victorian State Election

Electors were asked: “Regardless of who you would like to win, who do you think would win a Victorian State Election if held now?”

 

Victorian Electors 18+

Analysis by Region and State Voting Intention

 

Mar 20-28,

2012

June 5-13,

2012

July 10-11,

2012**

August 7-14,

2012

Melb

Country

ALP

L-NP

The

Greens

Ind/

Others

Can’t

say#

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

L-NP

63

56.5

57

60.5

61

59

42

79.5

56.5

62

24.5

ALP

23.5

33.5

30.5

26.5

25

31.5

43

13

33.5

6

38

Can't say

13.5

10

12.5

13

14

9.5

15

7.5

10

32

37.5

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

# Sample sizes less than 50 should be treated with caution. **Small sample for this interviewing period of only 136 electors mean these numbers must be treated with a degree of caution.

 

Would like to win the Victorian State Election

Electors were asked: “Regardless of who you think will win, who would you like to win a Victorian State Election if held now?”

 

Victorian Electors 18+

Analysis by Region and State Voting Intention

 

Mar 20-28,

2012

June 5-13,

2012

July 10-11,

2012**

August 7-14,

2012

Melb

Country

ALP

L-NP

The

Greens

Ind/

Others

Can’t say#

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

L-NP

48.5

47

39.5

45

41

57

5

92

10

42

-

ALP

40.5

41

43

39

40.5

35.5

     89

2.5

66

31.5

-

Can't say

11

12

17.5

16

18.5

7.5

6

5.5

24

26.5

100

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

# Sample sizes less than 50 should be treated with caution. **Small sample for this interviewing period of only 136 electors means these numbers must be treated with a degree of caution.

 

Better Victorian Premier — Ted Baillieu v Daniel Andrews

Respondents were asked: “Thinking of Mr. Baillieu and Mr. Andrews. In your opinion, who would make the better Victorian Premier — Mr. Baillieu or Mr. Andrews?”

 

Telephone Morgan Poll

Analysis by State Voting Intention

 

April 5-10,

2011

Mar 20-28,

2012

June 5-13,

2012

July 10-11,

2012**

August 7-14,

2012

ALP

L-NP

The

Greens

Ind/

Other#

Can’t

say

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Mr. Baillieu

60

53.5

41

35.5

43

15.5

68.5

32.5

34

32.5

Mr. Andrews

14

22

33.5

32

28.5

55

11.5

37.5

22

9

Baillieu lead

46

31.5

7.5

3.5

14.5

(39.5)

57

(5)

12

23.5

Other / Neither

26

24.5

25.5

32.5

28.5

29.5

20

30

44

58.5

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

# Sample sizes less than 50 should be treated with caution. **Small sample for this interviewing period of only 136 electors means these numbers must be treated with a degree of caution.

 

Telephone Morgan Poll

Analysis by Sex and Age

 

April 5-10,

2011

Mar 20-28,

2012

June 5-13,

2012

July 10-11,

2012**

August 7-14,

2012

Men

Women

18-24

25-34

35-49

50+

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Mr. Baillieu

60

53.5

41

35.5

43

  44.5

41.5

33

39.5

43

47

Mr. Andrews

14

22

33.5

32

28.5

30

27.5

36.5

26

25.5

29.5

Baillieu lead

46

31.5

7.5

3.5

14.5

14.5

14

(3.5)

13.5

17.5

17.5

Other / Neither

26

24.5

25.5

32.5

28.5

25.5

31

30.5

34.5

31.5

23.5

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

**Small sample for this interviewing period of only 136 electors means these numbers must be treated with a degree of caution.

 

Approval of Leaders — Ted Baillieu v Daniel Andrews

 

Victorian Premier: Ted Baillieu

Respondents were asked: “Do you APPROVE or DISAPPROVE of the way Mr. Baillieu is handling his job as Victorian Premier?”

 

Telephone Morgan Poll

Analysis by State Voting Intention

 

April 5-10,

2011

Mar 20-28,

2012

June 5-13,

2012

July 10-11,

2012**

August 7-14,

2012

ALP

L-NP

The

Greens

Ind/

Other#

Can’t

say

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Approve

50.5

40

29

20.5

29.5

10.5

50

17

19.5

20

Disapprove

23

38

53.5

63.5

47

66.5

27

73.5

49.5

41.5

Approve

- Disapprove

27.5

2

(24.5)

(43)

(17.5)

(56)

23

(56.5)

(30)

(21.5)

Can’t say

26.5

22

17.5

16

23.5

23

23

9.5

31

38.5

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

# Sample sizes less than 50 should be treated with caution. **Small sample for this interviewing period of only 136 electors means these numbers must be treated with a degree of caution.

 

Telephone Morgan Poll

Analysis by Sex and Age

 

April 5-10,

2011

Mar 20-28,

2012

June 5-13,

2012

July 10-11,

2012**

August 7-14,

2012

Men

Women

18-24

25-34

35-49

50+

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Approve

50.5

40

29

20.5

29.5

33

27

21.5

27

28.5

33.5

Disapprove

23

38

53.5

63.5

47

45.5

48

43.5

39

50

49.5

Approve

- Disapprove

27.5

2

(24.5)

(43)

(17.5)

(12.5)

(21)

(22)

(12)

(21.5)

(16)

Can’t say

26.5

22

17.5

16

23.5

21.5

25

35

34

21.5

17

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

**Small sample for this interviewing period of only 136 electors means these numbers must be treated with a degree of caution.

 

Opposition Leader: Daniel Andrews

Respondents were asked: “Do you APPROVE or DISAPPROVE of the way Mr. Andrews is handling his job as Leader of the Opposition?”

 

Telephone Morgan Poll

Analysis by State Voting Intention

 

Apr 5-10,

2011

Mar 20-28,

2012

June 5-13,

2012

July 10-11,

2012**

August 7-14,

2012

ALP

L-NP

The

Greens

Ind/

Other#

Can’t

say

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Approve

25

20

28

26

28.5

40.5

25

20

34.5

3

Disapprove

26.5

36

35

36.5

30.5

19.5

34

51

34.5

22.5

Approve

- Disapprove

(1.5)

(16)

(7)

(10.5)

(2)

21

(9)

(31)

-

(19.5)

Can’t say

48.5

44

37

37.5

41

40

41

29

31

74.5

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

# Sample sizes less than 50 should be treated with caution. **Small sample for this interviewing period of only 136 electors means these numbers must be treated with a degree of caution.

 

Telephone Morgan Poll

Analysis by Sex and Age

 

Apr 5-10,

2011

Mar 20-28,

2012

June 5-13,

2012

July 10-11,

2012**

August 7-14,

2012

Men

Women

18-24

25-34

35-49

50+

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Approve

25

20

28

26

28.5

32

25

28.5

25

24.5

32.5

Disapprove

26.5

36

35

36.5

30.5

32.5

28.5

15.5

24

28.5

38.5

Approve

- Disapprove

(1.5)

(16)

(7)

(10.5)

(2)

(0.5)

(3.5)

13

1

(4)

(6)

Can’t say

48.5

44

37

37.5

41

35.5

46.5

56

51

47

29

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

**Small sample for this interviewing period of only 136 electors means these numbers must be treated with a degree of caution.

 

VICTORIA HEADING IN “RIGHT” OR “WRONG” DIRECTION

Electors were asked: “Generally speaking, do you feel that things in Victoria are heading in the right direction or would you say things are seriously heading in the wrong direction?”

 

Telephone Morgan Poll

 

Nov 16-18,

2010

Nov 22-25,

2010

Nov 30

& Dec 1, 2010

April 5-10,

2011

Mar 20-28,

2012

June 5-13,

2012

July 10-11,

2012**

August 7-14,

2012

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Right direction

49.5

49

52.5

53.5

46

43

32.5

39.5

Wrong direction

36.5

33.5

25.5

27.5

39

36.5

51

42

Roy Morgan GCR*

113

115.5

127

126

107

106.5

81.5

97.5

Can’t say

14

17.5

22

19

15

20.5

16.5

18.5

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

GCR = Roy Morgan Government Confidence Rating (100 plus the difference between the percentage of people who say the country is “going in the right direction” and the percentage who say the country is “going in seriously the wrong direction”).  **Small sample for this interviewing period of only 136 electors means these numbers must be treated with a degree of caution.

 

VICTORIA

Ted Baillieu (Liberal) ‘Better Premier’

Those who preferred Ted Baillieu as Premier mentioned his honest and genuine personality, the financial position Victoria was left in by the previous Labor Government, the lack of visibility of Opposition Leader Daniel Andrews and also the fact many electors are more naturally aligned with Liberal philosophies than those of Labor.

“I don’t like Labor’s policies, they waste too much money.”

“The Labor Party in this country is shocking. They need a total wipe-out.”

“I think the Labor Party has stuffed up Victoria very badly.”

“The Labor Government handled things badly economically.”

“Just because he seems to know a bit more.”

“I feel he actually gets things done without lots of razzmatazz. He doesn’t have to be a show-pony like our previous Premier.”

“I believe in what he says. He’s not always right but I prefer him.”

“I believe in their policies and I believe that he is fiscally responsible.”

“The job he is doing at the moment is good enough to be in the top job and he’s doing a lot right.”

“He knows a bit more, he knows the state.”

“His experience and the principles he stands for.”

“I reckon he’s got good values.”

“He’s a Liberal.”

“He has a measured approach.”

“I am more aligned with his general philosophy and approach, I prefer the Liberal values to the Labor values.”

“He has more insight into how business gets done.”

“Baillieu is a good man. An honest man, but it is often mentioned that he isn’t strong enough.”

“I don’t hear of the other guy at all, I’ve never seen him.”

“I don’t know the name of the Opposition Leader, he has to lift his profile.”

“I have heard very little of Daniel Andrews. He’s an unknown quantity.”

“I can honestly say, I’ve never ever heard of the other fella.”

 

Daniel Andrews (ALP) ‘Better Premier’

Those who preferred Daniel Andrews as Premier mentioned the broken promises of Premier Baillieu regarding teachers and nurses, that Andrews is a hard-working man with the interests of the community at heart and that in general Baillieu lacks leadership and isn’t doing anything to really improve Victoria.

“Mr. Baillieu hasn’t kept any promises and he’s not in touch with the common man.”

“I don’t like the way Baillieu handled the teacher’s dispute.”

“I have heard a few bad things about Ted Baillieu. He said teachers should be better paid and went back on his promise and all good teachers are now going overseas.”

“Because of the cuts made to funding. The promises that Baillieu has broken since becoming Premier.”

“Because I’m a teacher and Mr. Baillieu has done nothing for us. I’d give someone else a go.”

“Labor looks after teachers and nurses and that hasn’t happened under the Liberal Government.”

“I don’t like Mr. Baillieu. I don’t like his policies. He spends the money in the wrong places. That’s what I think, I don’t think he’s spending the money wisely.”

“I’m not really happy with some of Baillieu’s policies and decisions.”

“Labor has better policies for funding state education.”

“I don’t think Ted Baillieu is doing anything.”

“I’m just not a Labour voter. It’s noting in particular about him.”

“He’s to the left of Baillieu and I’m more left-wing.”

“Ted Baillieu broke a whole bunch of promises. I think the Government should be bigger and not just look after the rich.”

“I work in the health-care industry.”

“Probably because Ted Baillieu is in already and not doing a great job.”

“I hate Mr. Baillieu, so I’ll go for the other guy.”

“Because Ted Baillieu promised all this stuff pre-election and he didn’t come through.”

“The other bloke (Baillieu) has been in power and he’s done nothing, he’s pathetic, he’s got no charisma. Andrews is much more enthusiastic.”

“I can’t believe what Ted has done with Tafe. I am absolutely gobsmacked. The arrogance and lack of foresight in removing skills training.”

“The tafe cuts, where we live in Lilydale and the Swinburne closure is a big issue.”

 

NEW SOUTH WALES

Barry O’Farrell (Liberal) ‘Better Premier’

Those who preferred Barry O’Farrell as Premier often mentioned the failures of the previous Labor Government and the fact they had left New South Wales in a terrible state that the new Liberal Government of O’Farrell has to clean up, also mentioned were the O’Farrell’s greater experience and his better, more honest, character.

“Mainly because of the previous records of Labor.”

“Because Labor had so many years and got the State into awful debt.”

“Probably because I’m just a bit sick of the Labor Party.”

“Because of the past performance of John Robertson and the past Labor Government.”

“I don’t like NSW being run by Labor.”

“The previous Government left us in millions and billions of dollars worth of debt.”

“I think he’s just more positive and more clear cut on what he’s doing.”

“He has been able to achieve a couple of the promises he made and there is nor really good argument against him at the moment.”

“Because he is tough and gets onto the job.”

“He’s got a big job on his hands and he’s handling it well.”

“I think Mr. O’Farrell has got more experience.”

“I think he’s doing a good job at the moment, even though I vote Labor.”

“He is more experienced and Mr. Robertson is an ex-union leader, and I am not a fan of union people.”

“I don’t think Mr. Robertson would be a very good Premier at all, therefore I support Mr. O’Farrell.”

“He’s going to be more honest and able to get the job done under very difficult circumstances with what he has been left with.”

“I think he’s an average Joe — he’s honest.”

 

John Robertson (ALP) ‘Better Premier’

Those who preferred John Robertson as Premier often mentioned an allegiance to the Labor Party and voting for them no matter what, and also because of his business background and the fact he has more ‘get-up and go and guts’.

“Because he’s more Labor than Liberal and I always sway to the Labor side of things.”

“Cause he’s Labor.”

“Because he has a business background.”

“Quite simply, I don’t like what Mr. O’Farrell is doing.”

“I think that we need a different perspective about Labor.”

“I’m a member of the Labor Party.”

“I would never vote for the Liberals as there’s a philosophical divide there.”

“I just disapprove of all the Liberal Party literature.”

“He’s got a lot more guts and get-up-and-go than O’Farrell.”

“I just like the way he speaks and presents himself.”

“I don’t think the other bloke is any good.”

“He is a better people person than the other dude.”


QUEENSLAND

Campbell Newman (LNP) ‘Better Premier’

Those who preferred Campbell Newman as Premier mentioned that he had far more experience than the Opposition Leader and appears as a tough leader with strong leadership qualities who gets things done and takes the hard decisions that are required.

“More experience.”

“I have to say Newman as I like the way he talks and the things he says and gets done. Most of the time politicians say certain things and then back out.”

“Mr. Newman has a track record of running an organisation.”

“Labor effectively bankrupted the country.”

“I don’t think she has any experience.”

“I generally approve of most of his ideas of cutting and that, and he seems reasonably strong in the way he’s handling things.”

“He had success when he was in the council office with the finance there and it was good. He inherited a debt as Premier and he’s changing it.”

“I like his tough actions, it’s needed now.”

“I had high hopes when I voted for him and the hopes are still there.”

“He’s making a lot of tough decisions and reducing the financial burden on Queenslanders. We have been left in about $65 billion in debt by the previous Government.”

“I’ve been following his career over the last few months and it seems like he’s doing more.”

“He’s somebody who gets the job done.”

“He just seems to be a leader.”

“I think he has a lot more experience than she does.”

“He is more forceful in what he does and Labor has made a lot of mistakes.”

“He has experience and vision.”

“Labor have failed dramatically. Federally and State-wise.”

“Newman has had all that experience at city hall. I think experience is terribly important for these sort of jobs.”

 

Annastacia Palaszczuk (ALP) ‘Better Premier’

Those who preferred Annastacia Palaszczuk as Premier often mentioned the many cuts to the public service made by Newman and that she comes across as down-to-earth and practical.

“I don’t like the cuts he’s making. I’m a public servant and he’s made a lot of cuts in our area in Cairns.”

“I can’t stand Campbell Newman. I’ve known too many people who’ve lost their jobs because of him. I also happen to work for a charity that has had it’s funding cut by him.”

“I am at very real risk of losing my job because of him and I am nervous as hell that I’m going to lose my job any day now.”

“I don’t think he is thinking about the impact of what cutting all of the jobs he’s been cutting and the future job cuts he intends to make. I am working with the Government myself and I see the impact it is having and the people who are losing their jobs.”

“The Newman Government is putting corporations before people. Its shutting down health services and cutting back health services and cutting funding for handicapped people. Basic services and medication are being cut.”

“I just don’t like Campbell Newman and the things he is doing in Queensland. I just don’t agree with his views and how he handles certain situations.”

“I don’t believe in cost-cutting a I don’t believe in the bad financial state that Mr. Newman claims he inherited.”

“She could hardly do a worse job than Newman is doing.”

“She has got down-to-earth ideas and she seems very practical.”

“I don’t agree with him (Mr. Newman). I don’t like the man.”

“The Labor Party do a lot better job, they only lost because they had to contend with storms, flood and drought.”

“Probably because a Labor Government is better than any Liberal National Government.”

“I think females make better leaders — they are more understanding and empathetic of situations.”

“The Liberals are more prone to corruption and are area biased and cut expenses in the wrong areas.”

“Because I dislike Newman. Anything would be better than him.”

 

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Colin Barnett (Liberal) ‘Better Premier’

Those who preferred Colin Barnett as Premier mentioned Barnett’s greater experience, his proven track record and good policies and that he does what he says he’ll do and doesn’t allow himself to be pushed around and is passionate about Western Australia.

“He’s a more experienced politician and I think he’s got a better team.”

“I just think he’s a better politician.”

“He’s got clear ideas and he manages the party well and has a good direction.”

“He’s got a proven track record.”

“I like him, he’s a professional.”

“I think he’s trustworthy. He’s a good financial manager.”

“A more competent individual. He has leadership qualities.”

“He’s got the best interests for Western Australia at heart and he can see the bigger economic picture.”

“He appears more trustworthy than Mr. McGowan.”

“Because he’s done a good job so far in my eyes.”

“Barnett handles things well in terms of people and what they want.”

“He’s been Premier so he is experienced as he has also been in Government a long time. McGowan is an unknown factor.”

“Barnett is more focused and more hardline. He does what he says he will do.”

“The Labor Party has a track record of stuffing things up.”

“We’ve had a lot better than him than any of the others.”

“He’s articulate and I’ve been around a long time and he’s been around a long time and I like what he stands for.”

“He’s done a lot for the State and put us back into credit. Our employment rate is ahead and he’s paid off the debt incurred under the previous Labor Government.”

“He’s got a lot of get-up and go. Western Australia is starting to go places because of him.”

“His experience, he’s number one. I believe he’s done a very good job so far.”

“He has a good track record and they have done well so far. I’m very anti-Labor.”

“He’s not done anything wrong so far.”

“I like the things he’s done so far. He’s down-to-earth and a pretty normal person really.”

 

Mark McGowan (ALP) ‘Better Premier’

Those who preferred Mark McGowan as Premier often mentioned their dislike of Premier Colin Barnett and he’s young, fresh, and more family oriented than Barnett who is out of touch with many people.

“McGowan is something fresh.”

“He is just better than Barnett I suppose.”

“McGowan is more compassionate than Barnett, who is above himself. Barnett only does what he thinks is right and disregards everyone else’s opinion.”

“McGowan is more in touch with the people. Barnett lives on the river and is a wealthy bloke and doesn’t know what it is like to live hard, live in the real world.”

“McGowan has more of a personality and is more adaptable to everyday issues, and what everyone in the State wants.”

“Mr. Barnett’s ideas are outlandish and he doesn’t really think them through.”

“I have had personal dealings with Colin Barnett and I don’t like him.”

“I think we need some new blood and we need someone we can trust.”

“McGowan is a bit younger and although a bit more naïve, he is an idealist and would therefore push to get things right — as opposed to Barnett who is really just ‘playing the game’.

“Because he is not a Liberal.”

“I have met and spoken to him before he became the Opposition Leader and I can relate to him.”

“We’re a very union-oriented family and so Labor is always going to look after us.”

“Barnett is too focused on development at the cost of the environment.”

“I think he’s got bigger balls.”

“McGowan is actually listening to the people and putting what we need first.”

“The way the man speaks, he cares about Western Australia. I believe that he’s kind, he’s a good family man.”

“I think he has more compassion and understanding of the people than Barnett does.”

“I’m not particularly happy with Colin Barnett. Bring in someone new, a person more people focused.”

“I know more about what he stands for and I couldn’t handle having the other guy continue as Premier.”

“I have no confidence in Colin Barnett. I’m embarrassed by the current Western Australian State Government. I think they’re terrible — particularly in education, I think they’re dreadful. The Minister of Education is completely out of touch with modern education policy.”

“McGowan should be given an opportunity.”